Hindu Temple

A Hindu temple is a symbolic house, seat, and body of the god. It is a structure designed to bring human beings and gods together, using symbolism to express the ideas and beliefs of Hinduism. The symbolism and structure of a Hindu temple are rooted in Vedic traditions, deploying circles and squares. It also represents recursion and equivalence of the macrocosm and the microcosm by astronomical numbers, and by "specific alignments related to the geography of the place and the presumed linkages of the deity and the patron".  A temple incorporates all elements of Hindu cosmos—presenting the good, the evil and the human, as well as the elements of Hindu sense of cyclic time and the essence of life—symbolically presenting dharma, kama, artha, moksha, and karma.

Batu Caves

Batu Caves is a limestone hill that has a series of caves and cave temples in Gombak, Selangor, Malaysia. It takes its name from the Sungai Batu, which flows past the hill. It is the tenth limestone hill from Ampang. Batu Caves is also the name of a nearby village.

Ekambareswarar

Ekambareswarar Temple (Ekambaranathar Temple) is a Hindu temple dedicated to the deity Shiva, located in the town of Kanchipuram in Tamil Nadu, India. It is significant to the Hindu sect of Saivism as one of the temples associated with the five elements, the Pancha Bhoota Stalas, and specifically the element of earth, or Prithvi. Shiva is worshiped as Ekambareswarar or Ekambaranathar, and is represented by the lingam, with his idol referred to as Prithvi lingam. His consort Parvati is depicted as Gowridevi Amman.

Siruvapuri

History of the temple has that Lava and Kusa, the sons of Rama lived in this place. Once when Rama was passing this place, they have fought a war with Rama himself without knowing that he was their father. As the young children waged a war here, the place was called as Siruvar Por Puri. (Siruvar means children, Por Puri means waging a war, in Thamizh). This place is now called as Chinnambedu, which originally was Siruvar Ambu Edu (children who took their arrows for the fight).

Tiruvannamalai

Tiruvannamalai (popularly styled as T.V.Malai and Trinomali or Trinomalee during British times) is a city and a special grade municipality in the Indian state of Tamil Nadu. The city is also mentioned as Arunai, Tiruvarunai, and Tondainattunallur in Tamil Tirumurai texts. The city is administered by a special grade municipality that covers an area of 13.64 km2 (5.27 sq mi) and a population of 145,278.[1] It is the administrative headquarters of the Tiruvannamalai District. Roadways are the major mode of transport in Tiruvannamalai, while the town also has rail connectivity.

Tirupati Devasthanam

Venkatnarayana Road Sri Balaji Temple (Tamil: ஸ்ரீ பாலாஜி) is a Hindu temple located inside the premises of TTD Information Center, Venkatanarayana Road, T.Nagar, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India. Venkateswara and Alamelu Manga are worshipped in this temple, which also has images of Hayagriva, Varaha, Sri Ramar, Sri Krishna, Andal, Charkratalwar, Ranganatha, Lakshmi, Sridevi and Bhumidevi, Brahma and Ramanujarcharya.

Kamakshi Temple

The Kamakshi Amman Temple of Mangadu is a Hindu temple in Mangadu, a suburb of Chennai, India. The term Mangadu means "Mango Forests or Mango Grooves" and as the term implies this must have been a thickly wooded Mango groove in times of yore

Palani Hill

Palani (or Pazhani) is a town and a taluk headquarters in Dindigul district, Tamil Nadu located about 100 kilometres (62 mi) South-east of Coimbatore, 100 kilometres (62 mi) north-west of Madurai, and 60 kilometres (37 mi) west of Dindigul. The Palani Murugan Temple dedicated to Hindu war God Kartikeya is situated on a hill overlooking the town. The temple is visited by more than 7 million pilgrims each year. As of 2011, the town had a population of 70,467

Payaraneeswarar

Once upon a time A trader carrying pepper told a lie that it was only pulse, fearing the high tax for pepper on those days. He paid a small tax for pulse and he moved on. Crossing the nearby town Vridhachalam, he found the pepper has turned into pulse. He understood that it was only a punishment imposed on him by the Lord of the Shiva, and offered worship there and got the pulse( Pulse is called as payar in tamil) back into pepper again. Hence the Lord of the shrine was called “Payaranee Nadhar or Payaraneeswarar” henceforth. The place was also called “Payaraneechuram”. 
 

Kailasanathar Temple

The kanchi Kailasanathar temple is the oldest structure in Kanchipuram. Located in Tamil Nadu, India, it is a Hindu temple in the Dravidian architectural style. It is dedicated to the Lord Shiva, and is known for its historical importance. The temple was built from 685-705AD by a Rajasimha ruler of the Pallava Dynasty. The low-slung sandstone compound contains a large number of carvings, including many half-animal deities which were popular during the early Dravidian architectural period. The structure contains 58 small shrines which are dedicated to various forms of Shiva.